Illicit Behavior: A Bad Boy Rockstar Romance(3)

By: Nikki Wild





While I checked things off on my clipboard, I noticed someone approaching the bar. I didn’t think much of it, and I continued my work for a moment. I was busy, and the shadow could see that.



Whoever it was, he could wait a minute.



Ticking a couple of more checks, I finally turned around to see the same biker from before – the jester of the group.



Well, more like the leader, from the way the other bikers regarded him. He was leering at me for some reason, and I felt a pit deep in my stomach.



“You forgot something,” he grumbled.



“Sorry,” I answered, letting my tone demonstrate how unapologetic I really was. “My memory’s a bit fuzzy. What was it?”



He sat an empty shot glass on the counter.



I glanced at it, then back up to him.



“I wasn’t kidding. I really don’t remember. What was it again?”



His eye twitched, but he backed off a little.



“Crown.”



“Oh, right,” I nodded, reaching for the liquor bottle. “Fireball shots for everyone, and another Crown for you.” If he’d have been any less of a total creep, I would have snuck him a second one, just to make up for it.



It wasn’t becoming for a bartender to have to scribble down the drink orders, but I’d been managing pretty well all night. On crazy nights, I took the excuse to do it, which made things run way less stressful for me.



Of course, it was on a simple shot for the most intimidating and questionable guy all night that I’d lose my train of focus.



“Here you go,” I placed it back down on the counter for him.



“Thanks,” he grumbled, walking away.



But he was still watching me out of the corner of his eye. I didn’t like it.



I sighed inwardly, turning to my other patrons. They’d been trying to ignore the raucous bikers, but even they could sense the unsettling tension in the room that had developed around the group.



And there was the way they looked at me…



Maybe I’d get lucky and they’d lose interest before closing time. Risking a quick look, I caught the big biker staring, a crooked smile growing across his unshaven face.



I’d never been a very lucky girl…





Chapter 3



Trent





After ditching the shitty after-party, it was a small matter to figure out where to go. I still felt like drinking, but if I’d stepped into any old bar here in the city I’d be recognized and ambushed for autographs and selfies.



Fuck that shit.



I needed something a little more discreet.



That’s why I slipped out and hopped into one of the rentals that were made available for band use. It was nothing special, just a shiny little red jeep – not really my style, but I didn’t really care. After all, who the fuck was I trying to impress out here?



Hitting the road, I found my way to the Interstate and just started driving.



Once I got away from the light pollution, the night sky was beautiful. Crystal clear stars without a cloud in view. It was hard to find the time to appreciate the stars when you were on seemingly permanent tour.



Only two more weeks of this shit.



Another little voice reminded me: for now.



That’s life. Hard work plus luck begets success. A spot of good luck definitely sparks the fire, but the hard work? That’s what keeps the blaze going strong. I knew damn well I’d be back on tour soon enough.



After about thirty minutes cruising down the highway in the rental jeep, I decided to take a chance on the next exit. Out here, the tall, monolithic restaurant and gas station sides were all weeded out, and I was lucky to spot a Chevron station from the interstate.



This particular exit looked like it led to the middle of nowhere. The sign said “Riverton”, but the endless, dark woods all around practically screamed “dilapidated little town.”



Never heard of the place.



Sounded small. Quaint.



Just to my tastes.



But after cruising down the main road into town, I realized that I might have chosen a place a little too small. There wasn’t a lot to this little backwoods town. Hell, I hesitate to even call it a town.



True to its namesake, it was situated on a riverbank. The spot was primarily residential, with a ton of ramshackle houses and borderline huts. Not a whole lot of businesses. You had your hardware stores, combination gas station slash small grocer, and a few tiny, ancient restaurants. This was one of those little commuter towns where everybody drives forty-five minutes to work in the city.

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